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6 Mini LPs

FAUST

Faust Image

Faust Image

Faust Image

Faust Image

Legendary German group, Faust, unwittingly responsible for creating the genre known as 'krautrock', played their debut concert in Poland in November 2006, thanks to the combined efforts of LTCo and AudioTong. It took place at Krakow's Loch Ness Klub and was professionally recorded for a release the group granted us. Titled 'Od Serca Do Duszy', this then appeared, finally, in late October 2007 as a 2CD and, all bias aside, sounds phenomenal.

A limited edition 2LP version of this release has also been mooted, but has had to remain shelved for the present due to the fact Faust had at least two other albums (including the live set on Dirter Promotions and, indeed, the new studio album) out in late 2007 as well. We hope, of course, to still realise this and will keep you informed regarding the matter's status.


Review from Ptolmaic Terrascope

Band reunions and anniversary tours aren’t really my cup of Earl Grey. Long lost combos with a few original members trying to rekindle past glories, playing to crowds who in the main were clueless first time round. The only exceptions to this rule are the magic Band, where players from completely different eras of Uncle Don’s family tree sounded as if they had been playing together for aeons, and Faust where, even with major bitchery in their ranks which resulted in certain pivotal players jumping ship, are still undoubtedly Faustian in every way, shape and deed – 2007 has already seen the release of Dirter Records’ live triple CD / DVD combination ‘In Autumn’ (www.dirter.co.uk) and now from the aforementioned Lumberton, in collusion with Poland’s AudioTong imprint (www.audiotong.net), emerges ‘Od Serca Do Duszy’ a double live CD that covers Faust’s first ever concert in Poland at Krakow’s Loch Ness Club in the latter stages of 2006. As a trio of Jean Herge Peron (bass, vocals and horns), Zappi (drums and metalwork) and relative newcomer Amaury Cambuzat, ex Ulan Bator, on guitars, keyboards and vocals, the band’s repertoire here is a three-way split between tasters for the forthcoming studio album, lengthy improvisations and revamped back catalogue material, which we’ll look at first. ‘It’s a Bit of a Pain’ (retitled ‘The Asshole’) originally from Faust IV is given a tougher, more metallic coating and rocks out in an unstoppable manner, in no small way due to Zappi’s extraordinary drum pound, where man truly is machine, the benefit of this version being that you don’t have to endure that “engaged telephone” blast that destroyed the momentum of the original. ‘Fast Head’ (alias ‘The Sad Skinhead’), again from Faust IV, was always regarded as a slight, novelty doodle, but here this song about violence and ignorance is immediately lead away from its past by dint of jean Herve’s declamatory howl. As for the tasters, the ‘Salauds, Salades’ with its stiff jointed funk motion immediately appeals. ‘Our Soul to Your Ears’ (is there perhaps a hidden pun here?) mixes pastoral guitar elegance and distant choir figures with drills and grinders which obviously shouldn’t work, but does. ‘We are not here.. and this is not Music’ employs more industrial tools and metal sheets, and gets even more wayward when calls of “Nothing! Your Tea’s Ready!” and “This is Serious” greet the ear. The second CD (improvs and encores) is where the trio really stretch out and flex Faustian muscle simultaneously, and as a consequence of that is getting more action at the moment, but I daresay it’ll even out. ‘Impro-Krakow I and II’ sees the rhythm section’s blunted and dark diddley beat supporting an epic fuzz/wah guitar volley that eventually disintegrates into a crackling bed of distortion. For the encores, ‘Rainy Day Sunshine Girl’ comes on like a VU experiment circa ’66 mixed with the nagging quality of the Softs’ ‘We Did It Again’ and could even be seen as a father figure to ‘Teenage Jesus Orphans’ if they’d’ve stretched the intro. ‘Schempal Buddha’ closes in much the same vein, taking repetition to new, unheard of levels. Another example (and finely recorded, too) of Faust’s undeniable timelessness. An essential purchase.